Article, History

THE LAST WALTZ FOR EUROPE

It was the last waltz for Europe and the last dance for humanity. Had one of Europe’s oldest, most successful and popular royal houses not been destroyed and consumed by New York-based banking houses the world would likely have been a far better place today.
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Instead, in 1917, American-Jewish banker Jacob Schiff backed by U.S. and European governments, in alliance with scores of supra-corporations, financed insurgents like Vladimir Lenin, Leon Trotsky, Jacob Sverdlov, who by violence toppled the legitimate government and royal dynasty of the world’s largest country.
The same globalists tried to seize war-ravaged Germany in 1918 – 1920 but were beaten off. The Russian Revolution was no more a revolution that was the later seizure and toppling of nations like Syria, Libya, and Iraq by the same messianic globalist tribe.

As consequence, the world’s largest gold reserves and mineral and material wealth harnessed to the millions assigned to the Gulag slave camps fell into the hands of Bolsheviks (U.S based globalists).

Imperial Germany, the British Empire, Europe’s African colonies would soon see their wealth seized and controlled by a small cabal of corporate banking dynasties based largely in the United States.

Those who attended Europe’s last great ball could never in their worst nightmare foresee their fate and that of the rest of the world. The entire Imperial Russian house, a European dynasty was about to be slaughtered or exiled and 70 millions of Russia’s 186 million Christian population martyred. The hangover from globalism would plunge the world into a century that, according to R. J. Rummel, Power, Genocide and Mass Murder, Journal of Peace Research, would result in the slaughter of 170 million people.

On February 11 – 13, 1903 the Winter Palace in St Petersburg hosted the grand costume ball.  It was the last ball of Imperial Russia. This grand ball, known as The Ball of 1903 was thought to be the grandest in the reign of the 290-year old Romanov dynasty.

The central events of the evenings were concerts at the Hermitage Theatre with scenes from the Boris Godunov opera by Modest Mussorgsky. The main roles were performed by Feodor Chaliapin and Medea Figner. Also playing to packed houses was the Minkus ballet La Bayadere and Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake by Marius Petipa, with the assistance of the legendary Anna Pavlova.

Advances in photography had made it possible to record to the finest detail folk costumes, clothes, hats, gloves, and shoes. By such means, we are able to identify individual items and sets belonging to participants of masquerade.

Nicholas II and Alexandra Feodorovna, Costume Ball 1903 | Ник
The last emperor of Russia Nicolas II (pictured) was robed in the golden brocade of 17th-century Russian tsar Alexey Mikhailovich. The Empress Alexandra Fedorovna appeared in the raiments of the first wife of Alexey Mikhailovich, Empress Maria Ilinichna – a brocade dress decorated with silver satin and pearls topped by a diamond and emerald-studded crown. Empress Alexandra Fedorovna wore a huge emerald. All the jewellery was chosen by court jeweller Carl Faberge. Today such a dress would cost approximately 10 million euros.

By order of Empress Alexandra Fedorovna the best photographers of St. Petersburg, Boasson and Egler, Alexander Renz and Schroeder, Levitsky, V. Yasvoin, D. Zdobnov and others, performed single portraits and group shots of participants of the ball.

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These photographs were the basis for the publication of the album containing about two hundred images. The world-class photograph albums were later distributed to raise considerable amounts of money for many charities. In this way, great wealth raised by the ball cascaded across the needy rather than being kept to the royal houses as was the protocol in other European royal houses.

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The souvenir album.

Dinner was served in the appropriately furnished Spanish, Italian and Flemish halls of the Hermitage. After the dinner, their Majesties with the participants of the ball headed for the Pavilion Hall, where the evening ended with dancing.

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Members of the royal family gathered in the Malachite Room and the rest in the surrounding areas. At eleven o’clock in the evening, all the participants of the last great ball of Europe started to dance in the Concert Hall, where on the gold-plated bars of the podium there was a court orchestra of Tsar Alexei Mikhailovich, in trumpeters’ costumes. Buffets were located in the Concert Hall and the Small dining tables with tea and wine in the Malachite Room.

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Princess Elisabeth of Hesse and by Rhine (1864–1918)

After dinner, guests and the hosts returned to the Concert Hall and danced till morning, waltzes, quadrilles, and mazurkas, Russian dances. Cavaliers were young officers; ladies were in sundresses and kokoshniks, men in suits of archers, falconers, and others.

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The memories of that last ball in 1903 did not die during the Soviet era. A special edition “Russian Style” pack of cards was produced in 1913, honoring the 300th anniversary of the House of Romanov. “Russian Style” playing cards were reprinted even after the Russian Empire collapsed, and became the most popular pack of cards in the USSR. Millions of Soviet people were unaware that they were holding the memory of the last Romanov fancy-dress ball in their hands.

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The jack of clubs was copied from Grand Duke Mikhail Alexandrovich’s apparel, and the jack of diamonds came from Grand Duke Andrei Vladimirovich. The queen of clubs was largely borrowed from the dress of Grand Duchess Elizaveta Fedorovna, and the queen of hearts resembles the tsar’s sister, Ksenia Alexandrovna, dressed as a boyar’s wife.

Curiously, Star Wars costume artist Trisha Biggar was inspired by the Russian-style dresses of female boyars with kokoshniks when designing the gold travel costume of Queen Amidala.

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Purchase on Amazon

All the visitors were in bejeweled 17th-century style costumes, made from designs by the artist Sergey Solomko, in collaboration with historical experts.

Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovitch recalled the occasion as “the last spectacular ball in the history of the empire … [but] a new and hostile Russia glared through the large windows of the palace … while we danced, the workers were striking and the clouds in the Far East were hanging dangerously low.”

The entire Imperial family, the Tsar as Alexei I, the Tsaritsa as Maria Miloslavskaya, all dressed in rich 17th-century attire, posed in the Hermitage’s theatre, many wearing priceless original items brought specially from the Kremlin, for what was to be their final photograph together.

All 390 guests were requested to come in traditional Russian 17th-century dress. This grand event was remarkable for its luxurious Russian-style costumes. Court ladies were attired in sundresses embroidered with precious stones and kokoshniks (head-dresses) adorned with the finest family jewels, while gentlemen boasted richly decorated caftans and boyar-style fur hats. / Grand Duke Andrey Vladimirovich.

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Recommended books: SLAUGHTER OF A DYNASTY and TROTSKY’S WHITE NEGROES by Michael Walsh.

THE 1903 BALL AT THE WINTER PALACE: THE LAST GRAND BALL IN IMPERIAL RUSSIA. A GREAT CHORUS OF PRAISE (“LIKE THE BEAUTIFUL SUN IN THE SKY, GLORY!”) FROM OPERA BORIS GODUNOV BY MODEST MUSSORGSKY

 

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